~   Ariana Reines, from [Trying To See The Proportional Relation] (via violentwavesofemotion)
~   Hannah Gamble, from Most People Would Rather Not (via violentwavesofemotion)

girlannachronism:

Valentino spring 2014 couture collection- “Le jardin d’Eden”, a zirconium-colored tulle dress, embroidered in silk threads, with a scene of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden inspired by the painting "Adam and Eve" by Lucas Cranach in 1526, taking 2,200 hours to hand embroider. 

(via minsquin)

~   Jean Rhys, Tigers are Better Looking (via paperswallow)

(via batifoler)

~   James Joyce, from Finnegans Wake (via anhelos)

(via batifoler)

awritersruminations:

Janet Malcolm — Abyss, from the Emily Dickinson Series, 2013 (detail)
25th Feb 201420:541,691 notes
kimams:

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

Holy shit. Amazing on so many levels.
25th Feb 201420:5418,073 notes
25th Feb 201420:531,880 notes
~   Michel Pastoureau, Blue: The History of a Color (via emmaylor)

(via grandeodalisque-deactivated2014)

~   Ben Mirov, Sleepless Night Ghost (via kdecember)
~   Boris Pasternak, from February (via violentwavesofemotion)

post-impressionisms:

In my Russian culture class today, we got to discuss one of my favorite paintings, Ivan the Terrible and His Son, by Ilya Repin (1885), and I wanted to share it, not only because it is a beautiful and compelling painting, but also because of the history behind it. 

Ivan IV of Russia, commonly known as Ivan the Terrible, is pictured here with his dead eldest son and heir, Ivan Ivanovich. 

It was a very hot day and Ivan Ivanovich’s wife was heavily pregnant and walking around in what Ivan deemed was less than proper attire for the wife of a tsarovich. When he forcefully told her as much, his son intervened on her behalf, defending his wife from his irate father. Infuriated at his defiance, Ivan struck him in the head with his staff, killing him. His eldest son and the heir to the Russian throne was now dead. After Ivan IV’s death a few years later, Russia fell into a long period of civil strife known as the Time of Troubles. 

I don’t want to focus on the politics, though.

This painting is one of Repin’s most famous, and understandably so. We see Ivan’s son, cradled to his father’s chest, dripping in vibrant red blood, with still a trace of shock in his eyes. 

Ivan’s (IV) face is what captivates me though. His eyes are enormous, much like you would find in Russian icon paintings. Ivan, although tsars claimed to be appointed by God, looks anything but holy in this image; in fact, he looks a little demonic. His face is filled with horror, revulsion, and disbelief. Did this really just happen? Is his son truly dead? How many times has he held his son like this before, when he was smaller? It’s all the more interesting to think of a young Ivan (IV), whose father died when he was barely a toddler, leaving him to become a child ruler whose early life was dominated by powerful regents. He grew up without a father; now, in a cruel twist, he has lived to see his own son die, and at his own hands.

Everywhere, the painting is saturated in red, one of the most beloved colors in Russian art. His son is bathed in white, dressed in pale colors, while he is shrouded in black, leaning into the shadows. The two figures jump out at the viewer from the center of the painting, forcing you to study the two of them. It’s painful to look at. But Repin’s masterful use of oil paint and light and dark make it very beautiful, too. 

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

weweretall:

I really relate
25th Feb 201420:5028,512 notes
portionsofeternity:

Professor’s Dream by Charles Robert Cockerell
25th Feb 201420:493,501 notes
rulesformyunbornson:

Rule 287. Make your own costume. 
(Above, Bowie as Warhol as Basquiat)
25th Feb 201420:481,181 notes
Opaque  by  andbamnan